The Hobbit: “Have your cake and eat it too”


The Hobbit is a wonderful story which began as a bedtime tale J.R.R. Tolkien dreamed up for his children. Although the book was first published in 1937, over seventy years ago, the current generation is receiving the same delight from the adventures of an unlikely hero, Bilbo Baggins the hobbit, and a great supporting cast of characters. This classic story didn’t need to have new life breathed into it, but movie director, Peter Jackson has done just that with three feature films produced by New Line Cinema.

I earnestly desire to “have my cake and eat it too” when it comes to loving a book and then having a movie made of it, but the movie must do it justice. The fact that this beloved book merited the making of three feature-length films with big, big budgets gives me hope that Tolkien’s story will be faithfully depicted. The second movie released in December 2013 picks up the story at chapter seven with Bilbo and his dwarf companions finding safety with Beorn the skin changer before they enter Mirkwood and its many dangers. This second movie is chockfull of compelling characters: The Elvenking, the wily dragon Smaug, and Bard of Lake-town.

My first impulse is to recommend that you read the book before seeing the movie so that you receive the story as the author intended it to unfold – the plot intact with detailed descriptions and the complete dialogue that defines the characters. Also, this particular story begs to be read aloud. Last year, I read it to my teen girls before we went to see the first movie (“The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey”). The Hobbit is the kind of book that contains beautiful words – fluid, funny and moving, that seem to flow directly from the mouth of the author to our ears.

I imagine Tolkien sitting by the fireside with his pipe in his hand, weaving the magic with his gravely voice, and I am the child at his feet: “The nights were the worst. It then became pitch-dark – not what you call pitch-dark, but really pitch: so black that you really could see nothing. Bilbo tried flapping his hand in front of his nose, but he could not see it at all. Well, perhaps it is not true to say that they could see nothing: they could see eyes. They slept all closely huddled together, and took it in turns to watch; and when it was Bilbo’s turn he would see gleams in the darkness round them, and sometimes pairs of yellow or red or green eyes would stare at him from a little distance, and then slowly fade and disappear and slowly shine out again in another place.” (p. 132)

J.R.R. Tolkien

However, there have been plenty of other times that I read the book after I saw the movie simply because I didn’t have time or I wasn’t even aware that the book existed. In those cases, reading the book after the movie became a worthwhile endeavor because as an interested movie fan, I received the equivalent of additional special features: it’s as if the book contained deleted scenes, and background information that the movie didn’t cover. Peter Jackson like many moviemakers before him has succumbed to the temptation to alter characters, shorten dialogues, and add entirely new scenes, mostly in this case to heighten the danger and suspense.

I highly recommend the hardcover edition of The Hobbit with color illustrations by Alan Lee published in 1997 by Houghton Mifflin. The story of the Ring that Bilbo finds continues in The Lord of the Rings as evil forces strengthen their stranglehold on Middle-earth. Its inhabitants must rise to even greater heights of bravery in the ultimate tale of good versus evil.

Here is a wonderful blog article on Tolkien’s perspective of his work as revealed through his correspondence:
apilgriminnarnia.com
“The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey” (released December 2012), “The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug” (release date December 13, 2013, and “The Hobbit: Here and Back Again” (release date December 17, 2014).

About these ads
Categories: British novels, Children's Books, Classics, Fantasy, Humorous, Inspiration, Read Aloud, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

Post navigation

9 thoughts on “The Hobbit: “Have your cake and eat it too”

  1. Pleased to be linked here! Thanks.

  2. My husband and I love watching The Hobbit movie and the other Lord of the Rings. I’m guessing the book is tons better? :)
    Thanks for visiting my blog btw! I love yours, such wisdom and creativity!
    Have a great day!
    -Katie
    http://www.hotteaandtheemptyseat.com

    • Thanks for “coming by” :) It’s truly like we are paying calls and putting our “cards” in the silver plate that is held by the butler when we visit one another’s blogs. I think the books by J.R.R. Tolkien are better – but the movies are fantastic… so you have a treat in store if you choose to put in the time to read them!

  3. Carol

    A recent Ollie’s find: The Unofficial Hobbit Handbook: Everything I Need to Know about Life I Learned from Tolkien by Peter Archer

  4. These are all such great books, but I have to say The Hobbit remains my favorite. There’s something so magical about the way it is written that just draws you into Middle Earth. While parts of it are very scary, it doesn’t have the dark sense of evil that can make reading The Lord of the Rings rather heavy work sometimes. IMHO :)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com. The Adventure Journal Theme.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 213 other followers

%d bloggers like this: